A few weeks ago we added a DECK!! It is 5 feet by 16 feet, with three wide steps that double as seating. The addition greatly adds to the living space and indoor/outdoor living I anticipate doing a whole lot of in this little house. I already spend a lot of time out there - eating meals, reading and visiting with friends. The resident and visiting animals seem to really dig it too.
The deck was built on two 5’ x 8’ frames that can be easily disassembled, so that I can pack it along with the stairs into the house, to take with me whenever I move. The deck foundation will have to be rebuilt to suit the grade of the land wherever the home is parked.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • iPhone 4S
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/20th
  • 4mm
A few weeks ago we added a DECK!! It is 5 feet by 16 feet, with three wide steps that double as seating. The addition greatly adds to the living space and indoor/outdoor living I anticipate doing a whole lot of in this little house. I already spend a lot of time out there - eating meals, reading and visiting with friends. The resident and visiting animals seem to really dig it too.
The deck was built on two 5’ x 8’ frames that can be easily disassembled, so that I can pack it along with the stairs into the house, to take with me whenever I move. The deck foundation will have to be rebuilt to suit the grade of the land wherever the home is parked.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • iPhone 4S
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/935th
  • 4mm
A few weeks ago we added a DECK!! It is 5 feet by 16 feet, with three wide steps that double as seating. The addition greatly adds to the living space and indoor/outdoor living I anticipate doing a whole lot of in this little house. I already spend a lot of time out there - eating meals, reading and visiting with friends. The resident and visiting animals seem to really dig it too.
The deck was built on two 5’ x 8’ frames that can be easily disassembled, so that I can pack it along with the stairs into the house, to take with me whenever I move. The deck foundation will have to be rebuilt to suit the grade of the land wherever the home is parked.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • iPhone 4S
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/172th
  • 4mm

A few weeks ago we added a DECK!! It is 5 feet by 16 feet, with three wide steps that double as seating. The addition greatly adds to the living space and indoor/outdoor living I anticipate doing a whole lot of in this little house. I already spend a lot of time out there - eating meals, reading and visiting with friends. The resident and visiting animals seem to really dig it too.

The deck was built on two 5’ x 8’ frames that can be easily disassembled, so that I can pack it along with the stairs into the house, to take with me whenever I move. The deck foundation will have to be rebuilt to suit the grade of the land wherever the home is parked.

A few shots of the interior shortly after moving in. There is more work to do, but the home is definitely comfortable and livable at this point. I have been loving every moment of living in this little home. Truly, no complaints!! The kitchen is spacious and efficient. I have enough storage for all of my belongings. And I have been sleeping remarkably well in the loft space. The next project will be to build bench seating that doubles as extra storage in the living space. 
I need to take photos with my SLR camera, rather than with the convenience of a phone camera. The quality will be better and I’ll be able to show a wider view of the space. Coming soon!!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • iPhone 4S
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/20th
  • 4mm

A few shots of the interior shortly after moving in. There is more work to do, but the home is definitely comfortable and livable at this point. I have been loving every moment of living in this little home. Truly, no complaints!!
The kitchen is spacious and efficient. I have enough storage for all of my belongings. And I have been sleeping remarkably well in the loft space. The next project will be to build bench seating that doubles as extra storage in the living space. 

I need to take photos with my SLR camera, rather than with the convenience of a phone camera. The quality will be better and I’ll be able to show a wider view of the space. Coming soon!!

I’ve fallen behind on posting on this blog, mainly because I moved!!

About a month ago, we towed the house from Marshall to my shop in Asheville for an open house or public house warming of sorts. Somewhere between 500-600 people came to step inside. Later than night we screened the film TINY and held a discussion with the Asheville Tiny Home Association (yup, that exists). It was heartwarming to witness the enthusiasm and interest others have in the idea of living small. #tinyhome #tinyhouse #nanostead

The exterior of the house is complete, and the focus has moved inward. 
The ceilings were covered with locally milled tongue and groove pine. They included some boards with sapwood, which has a nice slate blue tone to it. We sealed all of the interior ceilings and trim with a non-toxic product called Hemp Shield that protects the wood without yellowing the way poly does.
Next the floors were installed. I went to a construction surplus clearance house called Blue Ridge Surplus (see the photo with piles of wood in a warehouse), to purchase tongue and groove flooring. Originally we had hoped to install salvaged old pine flooring, but it didn’t come together. The surplus warehouse was the second best choice in this area, as far as price and salvaging what would have been waste material from another construction job.
One of the interior walls is covered with salvaged wood from the barn of a friend’s historical family cabin here in Asheville. The cabin is from the civil war era (now a registered historical place), and I am thrilled to have that piece of history in the home, especially because I know its origins and the family that stewards the cabin. The wood is dark, varies in tone, and some of it is even charred. I’ll likely leave it as is, though I am considering giving it a thin wash of milk paint so that is it not quite so dark.
They are now working on installing the kitchen and bath fixtures, lighting, etc. I have elected not to have much built-in storage or seating, in favor of finding tiny antique furniture. The kitchen cabinet is a vintage wooden buffet from the 60s. I found a small couch from the 30s, and am hoping to fit a beautiful antique armoire inside, though I think it is going to overtake the space. I will use an old oak table from my grandparent’s farmhouse. The idea is to live in the space for a while, to experience how I use it and what my needs are. If I find the furniture isn’t working, I will sell it and build custom storage and furnishing that suits how I live in the space. 
The final photo is of the chicken coop at Ashley and Glenn English’s homestead, where I will be parking the home in a field once complete. I am beyond excited to be living on their land! They are the sweetest and most generous people. Ashley is an author of several homestead and seasonal food books, and blogs at Small Measure.
For local folks, swing by the shop on Monday, August 25th to take a tour of the completed tiny home (it’ll be quick - there is only one room!!). We will be parking the home in the empty lot across the street from the shop. You’ll get a chance to step inside, as well as ask questions of both myself and the builders. Later that night we’ll screen the film TINY from 8-9pm, followed by a discussion facilitated by the Asheville Tiny Home Assocation. 
More event details here.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/24th
  • 3mm
The exterior of the house is complete, and the focus has moved inward. 
The ceilings were covered with locally milled tongue and groove pine. They included some boards with sapwood, which has a nice slate blue tone to it. We sealed all of the interior ceilings and trim with a non-toxic product called Hemp Shield that protects the wood without yellowing the way poly does.
Next the floors were installed. I went to a construction surplus clearance house called Blue Ridge Surplus (see the photo with piles of wood in a warehouse), to purchase tongue and groove flooring. Originally we had hoped to install salvaged old pine flooring, but it didn’t come together. The surplus warehouse was the second best choice in this area, as far as price and salvaging what would have been waste material from another construction job.
One of the interior walls is covered with salvaged wood from the barn of a friend’s historical family cabin here in Asheville. The cabin is from the civil war era (now a registered historical place), and I am thrilled to have that piece of history in the home, especially because I know its origins and the family that stewards the cabin. The wood is dark, varies in tone, and some of it is even charred. I’ll likely leave it as is, though I am considering giving it a thin wash of milk paint so that is it not quite so dark.
They are now working on installing the kitchen and bath fixtures, lighting, etc. I have elected not to have much built-in storage or seating, in favor of finding tiny antique furniture. The kitchen cabinet is a vintage wooden buffet from the 60s. I found a small couch from the 30s, and am hoping to fit a beautiful antique armoire inside, though I think it is going to overtake the space. I will use an old oak table from my grandparent’s farmhouse. The idea is to live in the space for a while, to experience how I use it and what my needs are. If I find the furniture isn’t working, I will sell it and build custom storage and furnishing that suits how I live in the space. 
The final photo is of the chicken coop at Ashley and Glenn English’s homestead, where I will be parking the home in a field once complete. I am beyond excited to be living on their land! They are the sweetest and most generous people. Ashley is an author of several homestead and seasonal food books, and blogs at Small Measure.
For local folks, swing by the shop on Monday, August 25th to take a tour of the completed tiny home (it’ll be quick - there is only one room!!). We will be parking the home in the empty lot across the street from the shop. You’ll get a chance to step inside, as well as ask questions of both myself and the builders. Later that night we’ll screen the film TINY from 8-9pm, followed by a discussion facilitated by the Asheville Tiny Home Assocation. 
More event details here.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/724th
  • 3mm
The exterior of the house is complete, and the focus has moved inward. 
The ceilings were covered with locally milled tongue and groove pine. They included some boards with sapwood, which has a nice slate blue tone to it. We sealed all of the interior ceilings and trim with a non-toxic product called Hemp Shield that protects the wood without yellowing the way poly does.
Next the floors were installed. I went to a construction surplus clearance house called Blue Ridge Surplus (see the photo with piles of wood in a warehouse), to purchase tongue and groove flooring. Originally we had hoped to install salvaged old pine flooring, but it didn’t come together. The surplus warehouse was the second best choice in this area, as far as price and salvaging what would have been waste material from another construction job.
One of the interior walls is covered with salvaged wood from the barn of a friend’s historical family cabin here in Asheville. The cabin is from the civil war era (now a registered historical place), and I am thrilled to have that piece of history in the home, especially because I know its origins and the family that stewards the cabin. The wood is dark, varies in tone, and some of it is even charred. I’ll likely leave it as is, though I am considering giving it a thin wash of milk paint so that is it not quite so dark.
They are now working on installing the kitchen and bath fixtures, lighting, etc. I have elected not to have much built-in storage or seating, in favor of finding tiny antique furniture. The kitchen cabinet is a vintage wooden buffet from the 60s. I found a small couch from the 30s, and am hoping to fit a beautiful antique armoire inside, though I think it is going to overtake the space. I will use an old oak table from my grandparent’s farmhouse. The idea is to live in the space for a while, to experience how I use it and what my needs are. If I find the furniture isn’t working, I will sell it and build custom storage and furnishing that suits how I live in the space. 
The final photo is of the chicken coop at Ashley and Glenn English’s homestead, where I will be parking the home in a field once complete. I am beyond excited to be living on their land! They are the sweetest and most generous people. Ashley is an author of several homestead and seasonal food books, and blogs at Small Measure.
For local folks, swing by the shop on Monday, August 25th to take a tour of the completed tiny home (it’ll be quick - there is only one room!!). We will be parking the home in the empty lot across the street from the shop. You’ll get a chance to step inside, as well as ask questions of both myself and the builders. Later that night we’ll screen the film TINY from 8-9pm, followed by a discussion facilitated by the Asheville Tiny Home Assocation. 
More event details here.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/40th
  • 3mm
The exterior of the house is complete, and the focus has moved inward. 
The ceilings were covered with locally milled tongue and groove pine. They included some boards with sapwood, which has a nice slate blue tone to it. We sealed all of the interior ceilings and trim with a non-toxic product called Hemp Shield that protects the wood without yellowing the way poly does.
Next the floors were installed. I went to a construction surplus clearance house called Blue Ridge Surplus (see the photo with piles of wood in a warehouse), to purchase tongue and groove flooring. Originally we had hoped to install salvaged old pine flooring, but it didn’t come together. The surplus warehouse was the second best choice in this area, as far as price and salvaging what would have been waste material from another construction job.
One of the interior walls is covered with salvaged wood from the barn of a friend’s historical family cabin here in Asheville. The cabin is from the civil war era (now a registered historical place), and I am thrilled to have that piece of history in the home, especially because I know its origins and the family that stewards the cabin. The wood is dark, varies in tone, and some of it is even charred. I’ll likely leave it as is, though I am considering giving it a thin wash of milk paint so that is it not quite so dark.
They are now working on installing the kitchen and bath fixtures, lighting, etc. I have elected not to have much built-in storage or seating, in favor of finding tiny antique furniture. The kitchen cabinet is a vintage wooden buffet from the 60s. I found a small couch from the 30s, and am hoping to fit a beautiful antique armoire inside, though I think it is going to overtake the space. I will use an old oak table from my grandparent’s farmhouse. The idea is to live in the space for a while, to experience how I use it and what my needs are. If I find the furniture isn’t working, I will sell it and build custom storage and furnishing that suits how I live in the space. 
The final photo is of the chicken coop at Ashley and Glenn English’s homestead, where I will be parking the home in a field once complete. I am beyond excited to be living on their land! They are the sweetest and most generous people. Ashley is an author of several homestead and seasonal food books, and blogs at Small Measure.
For local folks, swing by the shop on Monday, August 25th to take a tour of the completed tiny home (it’ll be quick - there is only one room!!). We will be parking the home in the empty lot across the street from the shop. You’ll get a chance to step inside, as well as ask questions of both myself and the builders. Later that night we’ll screen the film TINY from 8-9pm, followed by a discussion facilitated by the Asheville Tiny Home Assocation. 
More event details here.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/24th
  • 3mm
The exterior of the house is complete, and the focus has moved inward. 
The ceilings were covered with locally milled tongue and groove pine. They included some boards with sapwood, which has a nice slate blue tone to it. We sealed all of the interior ceilings and trim with a non-toxic product called Hemp Shield that protects the wood without yellowing the way poly does.
Next the floors were installed. I went to a construction surplus clearance house called Blue Ridge Surplus (see the photo with piles of wood in a warehouse), to purchase tongue and groove flooring. Originally we had hoped to install salvaged old pine flooring, but it didn’t come together. The surplus warehouse was the second best choice in this area, as far as price and salvaging what would have been waste material from another construction job.
One of the interior walls is covered with salvaged wood from the barn of a friend’s historical family cabin here in Asheville. The cabin is from the civil war era (now a registered historical place), and I am thrilled to have that piece of history in the home, especially because I know its origins and the family that stewards the cabin. The wood is dark, varies in tone, and some of it is even charred. I’ll likely leave it as is, though I am considering giving it a thin wash of milk paint so that is it not quite so dark.
They are now working on installing the kitchen and bath fixtures, lighting, etc. I have elected not to have much built-in storage or seating, in favor of finding tiny antique furniture. The kitchen cabinet is a vintage wooden buffet from the 60s. I found a small couch from the 30s, and am hoping to fit a beautiful antique armoire inside, though I think it is going to overtake the space. I will use an old oak table from my grandparent’s farmhouse. The idea is to live in the space for a while, to experience how I use it and what my needs are. If I find the furniture isn’t working, I will sell it and build custom storage and furnishing that suits how I live in the space. 
The final photo is of the chicken coop at Ashley and Glenn English’s homestead, where I will be parking the home in a field once complete. I am beyond excited to be living on their land! They are the sweetest and most generous people. Ashley is an author of several homestead and seasonal food books, and blogs at Small Measure.
For local folks, swing by the shop on Monday, August 25th to take a tour of the completed tiny home (it’ll be quick - there is only one room!!). We will be parking the home in the empty lot across the street from the shop. You’ll get a chance to step inside, as well as ask questions of both myself and the builders. Later that night we’ll screen the film TINY from 8-9pm, followed by a discussion facilitated by the Asheville Tiny Home Assocation. 
More event details here.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/137th
  • 3mm
The exterior of the house is complete, and the focus has moved inward. 
The ceilings were covered with locally milled tongue and groove pine. They included some boards with sapwood, which has a nice slate blue tone to it. We sealed all of the interior ceilings and trim with a non-toxic product called Hemp Shield that protects the wood without yellowing the way poly does.
Next the floors were installed. I went to a construction surplus clearance house called Blue Ridge Surplus (see the photo with piles of wood in a warehouse), to purchase tongue and groove flooring. Originally we had hoped to install salvaged old pine flooring, but it didn’t come together. The surplus warehouse was the second best choice in this area, as far as price and salvaging what would have been waste material from another construction job.
One of the interior walls is covered with salvaged wood from the barn of a friend’s historical family cabin here in Asheville. The cabin is from the civil war era (now a registered historical place), and I am thrilled to have that piece of history in the home, especially because I know its origins and the family that stewards the cabin. The wood is dark, varies in tone, and some of it is even charred. I’ll likely leave it as is, though I am considering giving it a thin wash of milk paint so that is it not quite so dark.
They are now working on installing the kitchen and bath fixtures, lighting, etc. I have elected not to have much built-in storage or seating, in favor of finding tiny antique furniture. The kitchen cabinet is a vintage wooden buffet from the 60s. I found a small couch from the 30s, and am hoping to fit a beautiful antique armoire inside, though I think it is going to overtake the space. I will use an old oak table from my grandparent’s farmhouse. The idea is to live in the space for a while, to experience how I use it and what my needs are. If I find the furniture isn’t working, I will sell it and build custom storage and furnishing that suits how I live in the space. 
The final photo is of the chicken coop at Ashley and Glenn English’s homestead, where I will be parking the home in a field once complete. I am beyond excited to be living on their land! They are the sweetest and most generous people. Ashley is an author of several homestead and seasonal food books, and blogs at Small Measure.
For local folks, swing by the shop on Monday, August 25th to take a tour of the completed tiny home (it’ll be quick - there is only one room!!). We will be parking the home in the empty lot across the street from the shop. You’ll get a chance to step inside, as well as ask questions of both myself and the builders. Later that night we’ll screen the film TINY from 8-9pm, followed by a discussion facilitated by the Asheville Tiny Home Assocation. 
More event details here.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 250
  • f/2.4
  • 1/17th
  • 3mm
The exterior of the house is complete, and the focus has moved inward. 
The ceilings were covered with locally milled tongue and groove pine. They included some boards with sapwood, which has a nice slate blue tone to it. We sealed all of the interior ceilings and trim with a non-toxic product called Hemp Shield that protects the wood without yellowing the way poly does.
Next the floors were installed. I went to a construction surplus clearance house called Blue Ridge Surplus (see the photo with piles of wood in a warehouse), to purchase tongue and groove flooring. Originally we had hoped to install salvaged old pine flooring, but it didn’t come together. The surplus warehouse was the second best choice in this area, as far as price and salvaging what would have been waste material from another construction job.
One of the interior walls is covered with salvaged wood from the barn of a friend’s historical family cabin here in Asheville. The cabin is from the civil war era (now a registered historical place), and I am thrilled to have that piece of history in the home, especially because I know its origins and the family that stewards the cabin. The wood is dark, varies in tone, and some of it is even charred. I’ll likely leave it as is, though I am considering giving it a thin wash of milk paint so that is it not quite so dark.
They are now working on installing the kitchen and bath fixtures, lighting, etc. I have elected not to have much built-in storage or seating, in favor of finding tiny antique furniture. The kitchen cabinet is a vintage wooden buffet from the 60s. I found a small couch from the 30s, and am hoping to fit a beautiful antique armoire inside, though I think it is going to overtake the space. I will use an old oak table from my grandparent’s farmhouse. The idea is to live in the space for a while, to experience how I use it and what my needs are. If I find the furniture isn’t working, I will sell it and build custom storage and furnishing that suits how I live in the space. 
The final photo is of the chicken coop at Ashley and Glenn English’s homestead, where I will be parking the home in a field once complete. I am beyond excited to be living on their land! They are the sweetest and most generous people. Ashley is an author of several homestead and seasonal food books, and blogs at Small Measure.
For local folks, swing by the shop on Monday, August 25th to take a tour of the completed tiny home (it’ll be quick - there is only one room!!). We will be parking the home in the empty lot across the street from the shop. You’ll get a chance to step inside, as well as ask questions of both myself and the builders. Later that night we’ll screen the film TINY from 8-9pm, followed by a discussion facilitated by the Asheville Tiny Home Assocation. 
More event details here.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 64
  • f/2.4
  • 1/100th
  • 3mm
The exterior of the house is complete, and the focus has moved inward. 
The ceilings were covered with locally milled tongue and groove pine. They included some boards with sapwood, which has a nice slate blue tone to it. We sealed all of the interior ceilings and trim with a non-toxic product called Hemp Shield that protects the wood without yellowing the way poly does.
Next the floors were installed. I went to a construction surplus clearance house called Blue Ridge Surplus (see the photo with piles of wood in a warehouse), to purchase tongue and groove flooring. Originally we had hoped to install salvaged old pine flooring, but it didn’t come together. The surplus warehouse was the second best choice in this area, as far as price and salvaging what would have been waste material from another construction job.
One of the interior walls is covered with salvaged wood from the barn of a friend’s historical family cabin here in Asheville. The cabin is from the civil war era (now a registered historical place), and I am thrilled to have that piece of history in the home, especially because I know its origins and the family that stewards the cabin. The wood is dark, varies in tone, and some of it is even charred. I’ll likely leave it as is, though I am considering giving it a thin wash of milk paint so that is it not quite so dark.
They are now working on installing the kitchen and bath fixtures, lighting, etc. I have elected not to have much built-in storage or seating, in favor of finding tiny antique furniture. The kitchen cabinet is a vintage wooden buffet from the 60s. I found a small couch from the 30s, and am hoping to fit a beautiful antique armoire inside, though I think it is going to overtake the space. I will use an old oak table from my grandparent’s farmhouse. The idea is to live in the space for a while, to experience how I use it and what my needs are. If I find the furniture isn’t working, I will sell it and build custom storage and furnishing that suits how I live in the space. 
The final photo is of the chicken coop at Ashley and Glenn English’s homestead, where I will be parking the home in a field once complete. I am beyond excited to be living on their land! They are the sweetest and most generous people. Ashley is an author of several homestead and seasonal food books, and blogs at Small Measure.
For local folks, swing by the shop on Monday, August 25th to take a tour of the completed tiny home (it’ll be quick - there is only one room!!). We will be parking the home in the empty lot across the street from the shop. You’ll get a chance to step inside, as well as ask questions of both myself and the builders. Later that night we’ll screen the film TINY from 8-9pm, followed by a discussion facilitated by the Asheville Tiny Home Assocation. 
More event details here.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 125
  • f/2.4
  • 1/24th
  • 3mm

The exterior of the house is complete, and the focus has moved inward. 

The ceilings were covered with locally milled tongue and groove pine. They included some boards with sapwood, which has a nice slate blue tone to it. We sealed all of the interior ceilings and trim with a non-toxic product called Hemp Shield that protects the wood without yellowing the way poly does.

Next the floors were installed. I went to a construction surplus clearance house called Blue Ridge Surplus (see the photo with piles of wood in a warehouse), to purchase tongue and groove flooring. Originally we had hoped to install salvaged old pine flooring, but it didn’t come together. The surplus warehouse was the second best choice in this area, as far as price and salvaging what would have been waste material from another construction job.

One of the interior walls is covered with salvaged wood from the barn of a friend’s historical family cabin here in Asheville. The cabin is from the civil war era (now a registered historical place), and I am thrilled to have that piece of history in the home, especially because I know its origins and the family that stewards the cabin. The wood is dark, varies in tone, and some of it is even charred. I’ll likely leave it as is, though I am considering giving it a thin wash of milk paint so that is it not quite so dark.

They are now working on installing the kitchen and bath fixtures, lighting, etc. I have elected not to have much built-in storage or seating, in favor of finding tiny antique furniture. The kitchen cabinet is a vintage wooden buffet from the 60s. I found a small couch from the 30s, and am hoping to fit a beautiful antique armoire inside, though I think it is going to overtake the space. I will use an old oak table from my grandparent’s farmhouse. The idea is to live in the space for a while, to experience how I use it and what my needs are. If I find the furniture isn’t working, I will sell it and build custom storage and furnishing that suits how I live in the space. 

The final photo is of the chicken coop at Ashley and Glenn English’s homestead, where I will be parking the home in a field once complete. I am beyond excited to be living on their land! They are the sweetest and most generous people. Ashley is an author of several homestead and seasonal food books, and blogs at Small Measure.

For local folks, swing by the shop on Monday, August 25th to take a tour of the completed tiny home (it’ll be quick - there is only one room!!). We will be parking the home in the empty lot across the street from the shop. You’ll get a chance to step inside, as well as ask questions of both myself and the builders. Later that night we’ll screen the film TINY from 8-9pm, followed by a discussion facilitated by the Asheville Tiny Home Assocation

More event details here.

It’s getting real.
The exterior siding is finished and looks incredible. The wood has already started to age and patina from the Lifetime treatment, so much that I hardly recognize it as pinewood. The plumbing and electric have been installed, spray foam insulation and sheetrock installed, and today we painted the walls. 
Later this week we will install wood floors, and tongue and groove wood on the ceiling, and then  begin work on installing the kitchen countertops, sink + stove. I’ve elected to go with only one cabinet (an antique buffet found at Oddfellows), as I prefer an open kitchen where you can see most everything either on shelves or hung on racks.
The last few photos were sent to me by Matt Christie at Green River Woods. I sell his end grain butcher blocks at my shop, and commissioned him to build one of the two kitchen countertops to be installed in the tiny home. If it weren’t for my budget, I would have asked him to make both, but you do what you can, right? We decided on a local spalted sycamore for the countertop, shown being hand-planed in the pictures above.
We’ve landed on an August 25th deadline to complete the home, so a lot is going to happen over the next few weeks. More updates soon….
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/120th
  • 3mm
It’s getting real.
The exterior siding is finished and looks incredible. The wood has already started to age and patina from the Lifetime treatment, so much that I hardly recognize it as pinewood. The plumbing and electric have been installed, spray foam insulation and sheetrock installed, and today we painted the walls. 
Later this week we will install wood floors, and tongue and groove wood on the ceiling, and then  begin work on installing the kitchen countertops, sink + stove. I’ve elected to go with only one cabinet (an antique buffet found at Oddfellows), as I prefer an open kitchen where you can see most everything either on shelves or hung on racks.
The last few photos were sent to me by Matt Christie at Green River Woods. I sell his end grain butcher blocks at my shop, and commissioned him to build one of the two kitchen countertops to be installed in the tiny home. If it weren’t for my budget, I would have asked him to make both, but you do what you can, right? We decided on a local spalted sycamore for the countertop, shown being hand-planed in the pictures above.
We’ve landed on an August 25th deadline to complete the home, so a lot is going to happen over the next few weeks. More updates soon….
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 40
  • f/2.4
  • 1/120th
  • 3mm
It’s getting real.
The exterior siding is finished and looks incredible. The wood has already started to age and patina from the Lifetime treatment, so much that I hardly recognize it as pinewood. The plumbing and electric have been installed, spray foam insulation and sheetrock installed, and today we painted the walls. 
Later this week we will install wood floors, and tongue and groove wood on the ceiling, and then  begin work on installing the kitchen countertops, sink + stove. I’ve elected to go with only one cabinet (an antique buffet found at Oddfellows), as I prefer an open kitchen where you can see most everything either on shelves or hung on racks.
The last few photos were sent to me by Matt Christie at Green River Woods. I sell his end grain butcher blocks at my shop, and commissioned him to build one of the two kitchen countertops to be installed in the tiny home. If it weren’t for my budget, I would have asked him to make both, but you do what you can, right? We decided on a local spalted sycamore for the countertop, shown being hand-planed in the pictures above.
We’ve landed on an August 25th deadline to complete the home, so a lot is going to happen over the next few weeks. More updates soon….
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/120th
  • 3mm
It’s getting real.
The exterior siding is finished and looks incredible. The wood has already started to age and patina from the Lifetime treatment, so much that I hardly recognize it as pinewood. The plumbing and electric have been installed, spray foam insulation and sheetrock installed, and today we painted the walls. 
Later this week we will install wood floors, and tongue and groove wood on the ceiling, and then  begin work on installing the kitchen countertops, sink + stove. I’ve elected to go with only one cabinet (an antique buffet found at Oddfellows), as I prefer an open kitchen where you can see most everything either on shelves or hung on racks.
The last few photos were sent to me by Matt Christie at Green River Woods. I sell his end grain butcher blocks at my shop, and commissioned him to build one of the two kitchen countertops to be installed in the tiny home. If it weren’t for my budget, I would have asked him to make both, but you do what you can, right? We decided on a local spalted sycamore for the countertop, shown being hand-planed in the pictures above.
We’ve landed on an August 25th deadline to complete the home, so a lot is going to happen over the next few weeks. More updates soon….
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 40
  • f/2.4
  • 1/60th
  • 3mm
It’s getting real.
The exterior siding is finished and looks incredible. The wood has already started to age and patina from the Lifetime treatment, so much that I hardly recognize it as pinewood. The plumbing and electric have been installed, spray foam insulation and sheetrock installed, and today we painted the walls. 
Later this week we will install wood floors, and tongue and groove wood on the ceiling, and then  begin work on installing the kitchen countertops, sink + stove. I’ve elected to go with only one cabinet (an antique buffet found at Oddfellows), as I prefer an open kitchen where you can see most everything either on shelves or hung on racks.
The last few photos were sent to me by Matt Christie at Green River Woods. I sell his end grain butcher blocks at my shop, and commissioned him to build one of the two kitchen countertops to be installed in the tiny home. If it weren’t for my budget, I would have asked him to make both, but you do what you can, right? We decided on a local spalted sycamore for the countertop, shown being hand-planed in the pictures above.
We’ve landed on an August 25th deadline to complete the home, so a lot is going to happen over the next few weeks. More updates soon….
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/24th
  • 3mm
It’s getting real.
The exterior siding is finished and looks incredible. The wood has already started to age and patina from the Lifetime treatment, so much that I hardly recognize it as pinewood. The plumbing and electric have been installed, spray foam insulation and sheetrock installed, and today we painted the walls. 
Later this week we will install wood floors, and tongue and groove wood on the ceiling, and then  begin work on installing the kitchen countertops, sink + stove. I’ve elected to go with only one cabinet (an antique buffet found at Oddfellows), as I prefer an open kitchen where you can see most everything either on shelves or hung on racks.
The last few photos were sent to me by Matt Christie at Green River Woods. I sell his end grain butcher blocks at my shop, and commissioned him to build one of the two kitchen countertops to be installed in the tiny home. If it weren’t for my budget, I would have asked him to make both, but you do what you can, right? We decided on a local spalted sycamore for the countertop, shown being hand-planed in the pictures above.
We’ve landed on an August 25th deadline to complete the home, so a lot is going to happen over the next few weeks. More updates soon….
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 64
  • f/2.4
  • 1/24th
  • 3mm
It’s getting real.
The exterior siding is finished and looks incredible. The wood has already started to age and patina from the Lifetime treatment, so much that I hardly recognize it as pinewood. The plumbing and electric have been installed, spray foam insulation and sheetrock installed, and today we painted the walls. 
Later this week we will install wood floors, and tongue and groove wood on the ceiling, and then  begin work on installing the kitchen countertops, sink + stove. I’ve elected to go with only one cabinet (an antique buffet found at Oddfellows), as I prefer an open kitchen where you can see most everything either on shelves or hung on racks.
The last few photos were sent to me by Matt Christie at Green River Woods. I sell his end grain butcher blocks at my shop, and commissioned him to build one of the two kitchen countertops to be installed in the tiny home. If it weren’t for my budget, I would have asked him to make both, but you do what you can, right? We decided on a local spalted sycamore for the countertop, shown being hand-planed in the pictures above.
We’ve landed on an August 25th deadline to complete the home, so a lot is going to happen over the next few weeks. More updates soon….
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 80
  • f/2.4
  • 1/25th
  • 3mm
It’s getting real.
The exterior siding is finished and looks incredible. The wood has already started to age and patina from the Lifetime treatment, so much that I hardly recognize it as pinewood. The plumbing and electric have been installed, spray foam insulation and sheetrock installed, and today we painted the walls. 
Later this week we will install wood floors, and tongue and groove wood on the ceiling, and then  begin work on installing the kitchen countertops, sink + stove. I’ve elected to go with only one cabinet (an antique buffet found at Oddfellows), as I prefer an open kitchen where you can see most everything either on shelves or hung on racks.
The last few photos were sent to me by Matt Christie at Green River Woods. I sell his end grain butcher blocks at my shop, and commissioned him to build one of the two kitchen countertops to be installed in the tiny home. If it weren’t for my budget, I would have asked him to make both, but you do what you can, right? We decided on a local spalted sycamore for the countertop, shown being hand-planed in the pictures above.
We’ve landed on an August 25th deadline to complete the home, so a lot is going to happen over the next few weeks. More updates soon….
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/30th
  • 3mm
It’s getting real.
The exterior siding is finished and looks incredible. The wood has already started to age and patina from the Lifetime treatment, so much that I hardly recognize it as pinewood. The plumbing and electric have been installed, spray foam insulation and sheetrock installed, and today we painted the walls. 
Later this week we will install wood floors, and tongue and groove wood on the ceiling, and then  begin work on installing the kitchen countertops, sink + stove. I’ve elected to go with only one cabinet (an antique buffet found at Oddfellows), as I prefer an open kitchen where you can see most everything either on shelves or hung on racks.
The last few photos were sent to me by Matt Christie at Green River Woods. I sell his end grain butcher blocks at my shop, and commissioned him to build one of the two kitchen countertops to be installed in the tiny home. If it weren’t for my budget, I would have asked him to make both, but you do what you can, right? We decided on a local spalted sycamore for the countertop, shown being hand-planed in the pictures above.
We’ve landed on an August 25th deadline to complete the home, so a lot is going to happen over the next few weeks. More updates soon….
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Panasonic DMC-ZS7
  • 1600
  • f/3.5
  • 1/100th
  • 4mm
It’s getting real.
The exterior siding is finished and looks incredible. The wood has already started to age and patina from the Lifetime treatment, so much that I hardly recognize it as pinewood. The plumbing and electric have been installed, spray foam insulation and sheetrock installed, and today we painted the walls. 
Later this week we will install wood floors, and tongue and groove wood on the ceiling, and then  begin work on installing the kitchen countertops, sink + stove. I’ve elected to go with only one cabinet (an antique buffet found at Oddfellows), as I prefer an open kitchen where you can see most everything either on shelves or hung on racks.
The last few photos were sent to me by Matt Christie at Green River Woods. I sell his end grain butcher blocks at my shop, and commissioned him to build one of the two kitchen countertops to be installed in the tiny home. If it weren’t for my budget, I would have asked him to make both, but you do what you can, right? We decided on a local spalted sycamore for the countertop, shown being hand-planed in the pictures above.
We’ve landed on an August 25th deadline to complete the home, so a lot is going to happen over the next few weeks. More updates soon….
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Panasonic DMC-ZS7
  • 1600
  • f/3.5
  • 1/100th
  • 4mm

It’s getting real.

The exterior siding is finished and looks incredible. The wood has already started to age and patina from the Lifetime treatment, so much that I hardly recognize it as pinewood. The plumbing and electric have been installed, spray foam insulation and sheetrock installed, and today we painted the walls. 

Later this week we will install wood floors, and tongue and groove wood on the ceiling, and then  begin work on installing the kitchen countertops, sink + stove. I’ve elected to go with only one cabinet (an antique buffet found at Oddfellows), as I prefer an open kitchen where you can see most everything either on shelves or hung on racks.

The last few photos were sent to me by Matt Christie at Green River Woods. I sell his end grain butcher blocks at my shop, and commissioned him to build one of the two kitchen countertops to be installed in the tiny home. If it weren’t for my budget, I would have asked him to make both, but you do what you can, right? We decided on a local spalted sycamore for the countertop, shown being hand-planed in the pictures above.

We’ve landed on an August 25th deadline to complete the home, so a lot is going to happen over the next few weeks. More updates soon….

Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/2320th
  • 3mm
Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/322th
  • 3mm
Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/1656th
  • 3mm
Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/1208th
  • 3mm
Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/120th
  • 3mm
Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/120th
  • 2mm
Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/426th
  • 3mm

Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 

The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.

I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 

My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 

I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.

WHY TINY? 

To get grounded, to get free.

The above pictures (taken from the web) are of Curry Village in Yosemite National Park, where I lived and worked nearly twenty years ago. Myself, along with most employees in the park, lived in these clustered tent cabins. We worked and played, hiked and swam, made art and music, read books, and cooked in our free time, which we had a lot of. The tent cabin, no larger than 10 x 10 feet, was mostly a place to rest, to store my belongings. The rest of my days were spent out of doors, not in the recreational sense, as we tend to think when we think of a national park, but in the sense of literally living outside of my home.

It was an idyllic setting, living at the base of a peaceful valley amongst the backdrop of sublime glacial walls. The simplicity of my home, my lack of possessions, the abundance of friends at my doorstep, the secret swimming holes, the night sky as my theater - I can’t recall a time in my life that I felt more free. Granted, I had far less responsibility than I do now, but perhaps that is the essence of what tiny living is about. 

Since then I have lived in a few other small dwellings. For most of my twenties I insisted that all of my possessions should fit in the back of a van. I needed a physical limit to what I considered to be enough. I spent three years in a 200 square foot studio basement apartment in San Francisco. And another eight months in a 1950s mobile trailer on the turquoise shores of Abel Tasman, New Zealand. These sort of conditions seem to suit me. They provide a nest, a place of solitude for my introverted nature, yet they are too small to spend significant amounts of time in. They encourage stepping outside more often, staying in tune with one’s surroundings, whether that be a forest or city block, a neighbor or a bird.

Small quarters limit our ability to acquire. It creates a framework for making concessions and compromises. It helps us evaluate what is essential and worthy of our time, our money, our attention. It is truly remarkable how little I actually need to be content. I’ve been testing the boundaries of this, and have found for myself, the more that I own and the more that I want, the more burdened I feel. The conscious choice to live with less, for myself, is akin to freedom. There are plenty of inspirational quotes that say that far more eloquently. You’ve probably heard them. 

That said, we’re all in need of shelter, and have different perspectives on what is enough depending on an infinite number of factors. I’ve been rambling for most of my life and at some point felt that I needed a HOME. A physical place to ground me, a place to return to. Though personally, I don’t care to get weighed down by mortgage payments, home maintenance and decoration. Maybe I’m just lazy. Who knows. Who cares. What matters is that I’ve had a taste of what it means to live with less responsibility, and it’s more joyful. I’m referring to a personal kind of responsibility - the kind that has everything to do with me, my comfort level, my preferences, my status. It is an entirely self-imposed responsibility based on distinct life choices.

I can live in a very small home, with fewer possessions, and still be a highly responsible adult. In fact, I’d argue that it makes me more responsible to my community and society as a whole.

I know myself.

The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
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  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/125th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 40
  • f/2.4
  • 1/24th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 64
  • f/2.4
  • 1/24th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 80
  • f/2.4
  • 1/24th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 200
  • f/2.4
  • 1/24th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/120th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/253th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 40
  • f/2.4
  • 1/120th
  • 3mm

The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 

Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!

Last week I checked out the progress of the home construction. The loft and roof are framed out, and the structural sheathing panels are up. A sense of the space is tangible now, and I must say, it is definitely tiny!!! 
It will be a few more weeks until the doors and windows arrive. In the meantime, Tony and I have been scouting for materials and finishes for the interior flooring, walls + ceiling. We visited Blue Ridge Surplus in West Asheville, a construction salvage yard that has piles and piles of excess materials left over from construction jobs at discount prices. I was so distracted by everything they sell that I forgot to take pictures…will be sure to do so when we go back there to purchase.
We also visited Build It Naturally in downtown Asheville, a retail store selling quality sustainable building materials. We will be purchasing non-toxic wood finishes and paints from them, including a cool product called LifeTime, a non-toxic natural substance that penetrates wood fibers to create a permanent seal without creating harmful residues in our soil and water. It allows the wood to age beautifully without rot or decay. 
This week I plan to build a digital model of the interior with Google Sketchup, to work on the design and placement of interior furnishings, like seating and tables, and then consult with my friend Rob Maddox, an architect at Shelter Collective, for ideas on how to maximize the function of the space without cluttering it. 
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/1159th
  • 3mm
Last week I checked out the progress of the home construction. The loft and roof are framed out, and the structural sheathing panels are up. A sense of the space is tangible now, and I must say, it is definitely tiny!!! 
It will be a few more weeks until the doors and windows arrive. In the meantime, Tony and I have been scouting for materials and finishes for the interior flooring, walls + ceiling. We visited Blue Ridge Surplus in West Asheville, a construction salvage yard that has piles and piles of excess materials left over from construction jobs at discount prices. I was so distracted by everything they sell that I forgot to take pictures…will be sure to do so when we go back there to purchase.
We also visited Build It Naturally in downtown Asheville, a retail store selling quality sustainable building materials. We will be purchasing non-toxic wood finishes and paints from them, including a cool product called LifeTime, a non-toxic natural substance that penetrates wood fibers to create a permanent seal without creating harmful residues in our soil and water. It allows the wood to age beautifully without rot or decay. 
This week I plan to build a digital model of the interior with Google Sketchup, to work on the design and placement of interior furnishings, like seating and tables, and then consult with my friend Rob Maddox, an architect at Shelter Collective, for ideas on how to maximize the function of the space without cluttering it. 
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/120th
  • 3mm
Last week I checked out the progress of the home construction. The loft and roof are framed out, and the structural sheathing panels are up. A sense of the space is tangible now, and I must say, it is definitely tiny!!! 
It will be a few more weeks until the doors and windows arrive. In the meantime, Tony and I have been scouting for materials and finishes for the interior flooring, walls + ceiling. We visited Blue Ridge Surplus in West Asheville, a construction salvage yard that has piles and piles of excess materials left over from construction jobs at discount prices. I was so distracted by everything they sell that I forgot to take pictures…will be sure to do so when we go back there to purchase.
We also visited Build It Naturally in downtown Asheville, a retail store selling quality sustainable building materials. We will be purchasing non-toxic wood finishes and paints from them, including a cool product called LifeTime, a non-toxic natural substance that penetrates wood fibers to create a permanent seal without creating harmful residues in our soil and water. It allows the wood to age beautifully without rot or decay. 
This week I plan to build a digital model of the interior with Google Sketchup, to work on the design and placement of interior furnishings, like seating and tables, and then consult with my friend Rob Maddox, an architect at Shelter Collective, for ideas on how to maximize the function of the space without cluttering it. 
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/597th
  • 3mm
Last week I checked out the progress of the home construction. The loft and roof are framed out, and the structural sheathing panels are up. A sense of the space is tangible now, and I must say, it is definitely tiny!!! 
It will be a few more weeks until the doors and windows arrive. In the meantime, Tony and I have been scouting for materials and finishes for the interior flooring, walls + ceiling. We visited Blue Ridge Surplus in West Asheville, a construction salvage yard that has piles and piles of excess materials left over from construction jobs at discount prices. I was so distracted by everything they sell that I forgot to take pictures…will be sure to do so when we go back there to purchase.
We also visited Build It Naturally in downtown Asheville, a retail store selling quality sustainable building materials. We will be purchasing non-toxic wood finishes and paints from them, including a cool product called LifeTime, a non-toxic natural substance that penetrates wood fibers to create a permanent seal without creating harmful residues in our soil and water. It allows the wood to age beautifully without rot or decay. 
This week I plan to build a digital model of the interior with Google Sketchup, to work on the design and placement of interior furnishings, like seating and tables, and then consult with my friend Rob Maddox, an architect at Shelter Collective, for ideas on how to maximize the function of the space without cluttering it. 
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/345th
  • 3mm

Last week I checked out the progress of the home construction. The loft and roof are framed out, and the structural sheathing panels are up. A sense of the space is tangible now, and I must say, it is definitely tiny!!! 

It will be a few more weeks until the doors and windows arrive. In the meantime, Tony and I have been scouting for materials and finishes for the interior flooring, walls + ceiling. We visited Blue Ridge Surplus in West Asheville, a construction salvage yard that has piles and piles of excess materials left over from construction jobs at discount prices. I was so distracted by everything they sell that I forgot to take pictures…will be sure to do so when we go back there to purchase.

We also visited Build It Naturally in downtown Asheville, a retail store selling quality sustainable building materials. We will be purchasing non-toxic wood finishes and paints from them, including a cool product called LifeTime, a non-toxic natural substance that penetrates wood fibers to create a permanent seal without creating harmful residues in our soil and water. It allows the wood to age beautifully without rot or decay. 

This week I plan to build a digital model of the interior with Google Sketchup, to work on the design and placement of interior furnishings, like seating and tables, and then consult with my friend Rob Maddox, an architect at Shelter Collective, for ideas on how to maximize the function of the space without cluttering it. 

I finally made it out to the job site to see the tiny house project in person. It is parked in an empty lot on Main Street in downtown Marshall, NC, along the French Broad River. Such a beautiful and charming town. Someone was playing Johnny Cash covers in front of town hall.
Jeramy and Tony, pictured above, are the building team behind Nanostead. They are working on this project, their first tiny home on wheels, in between other home building projects, so progress is expected be a touch slower than one might expect. 
They are framing out the walls, and today we decided on window and door options. We all agreed that windows and insulation are some of the fundamental elements in a home that you don’t want to skimp on. 
I left there feeling inspired, excited to see it take shape, and am thankful to have such good people building a home for me. It all feels just right.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/190th
  • 3mm
I finally made it out to the job site to see the tiny house project in person. It is parked in an empty lot on Main Street in downtown Marshall, NC, along the French Broad River. Such a beautiful and charming town. Someone was playing Johnny Cash covers in front of town hall.
Jeramy and Tony, pictured above, are the building team behind Nanostead. They are working on this project, their first tiny home on wheels, in between other home building projects, so progress is expected be a touch slower than one might expect. 
They are framing out the walls, and today we decided on window and door options. We all agreed that windows and insulation are some of the fundamental elements in a home that you don’t want to skimp on. 
I left there feeling inspired, excited to see it take shape, and am thankful to have such good people building a home for me. It all feels just right.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/420th
  • 3mm
I finally made it out to the job site to see the tiny house project in person. It is parked in an empty lot on Main Street in downtown Marshall, NC, along the French Broad River. Such a beautiful and charming town. Someone was playing Johnny Cash covers in front of town hall.
Jeramy and Tony, pictured above, are the building team behind Nanostead. They are working on this project, their first tiny home on wheels, in between other home building projects, so progress is expected be a touch slower than one might expect. 
They are framing out the walls, and today we decided on window and door options. We all agreed that windows and insulation are some of the fundamental elements in a home that you don’t want to skimp on. 
I left there feeling inspired, excited to see it take shape, and am thankful to have such good people building a home for me. It all feels just right.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/191th
  • 3mm
I finally made it out to the job site to see the tiny house project in person. It is parked in an empty lot on Main Street in downtown Marshall, NC, along the French Broad River. Such a beautiful and charming town. Someone was playing Johnny Cash covers in front of town hall.
Jeramy and Tony, pictured above, are the building team behind Nanostead. They are working on this project, their first tiny home on wheels, in between other home building projects, so progress is expected be a touch slower than one might expect. 
They are framing out the walls, and today we decided on window and door options. We all agreed that windows and insulation are some of the fundamental elements in a home that you don’t want to skimp on. 
I left there feeling inspired, excited to see it take shape, and am thankful to have such good people building a home for me. It all feels just right.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/252th
  • 3mm
I finally made it out to the job site to see the tiny house project in person. It is parked in an empty lot on Main Street in downtown Marshall, NC, along the French Broad River. Such a beautiful and charming town. Someone was playing Johnny Cash covers in front of town hall.
Jeramy and Tony, pictured above, are the building team behind Nanostead. They are working on this project, their first tiny home on wheels, in between other home building projects, so progress is expected be a touch slower than one might expect. 
They are framing out the walls, and today we decided on window and door options. We all agreed that windows and insulation are some of the fundamental elements in a home that you don’t want to skimp on. 
I left there feeling inspired, excited to see it take shape, and am thankful to have such good people building a home for me. It all feels just right.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/337th
  • 3mm

I finally made it out to the job site to see the tiny house project in person. It is parked in an empty lot on Main Street in downtown Marshall, NC, along the French Broad River. Such a beautiful and charming town. Someone was playing Johnny Cash covers in front of town hall.

Jeramy and Tony, pictured above, are the building team behind Nanostead. They are working on this project, their first tiny home on wheels, in between other home building projects, so progress is expected be a touch slower than one might expect. 

They are framing out the walls, and today we decided on window and door options. We all agreed that windows and insulation are some of the fundamental elements in a home that you don’t want to skimp on. 

I left there feeling inspired, excited to see it take shape, and am thankful to have such good people building a home for me. It all feels just right.

It’s a tiny home village. If all goes according to plan, I will be parking the tiny home on my friend’s land in Candler, in this field next to this yome. It is an ideal spot in so many ways.
For one, I’ll be in the company of good friends with whom I share similar values and lifestyle choices. They have a beautiful homestead with a large vegetable garden, chickens, bees, and seemingly infinite forest to explore. I feel incredibly honored to be warmly welcome onto their land as an extension of their community.
Other important things to consider are electricity and water. There is already an electrical pole complete with AC outlets, so that I can simply plug the house in for power. There is also a nearby creek from which I can pump water for the kitchen sink + shower, and a nearby well where I can collect fresh drinking water. The home will have a composting dry toilet, for which I will need to setup a humanure system. 
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/463th
  • 3mm

It’s a tiny home village. If all goes according to plan, I will be parking the tiny home on my friend’s land in Candler, in this field next to this yome. It is an ideal spot in so many ways.

For one, I’ll be in the company of good friends with whom I share similar values and lifestyle choices. They have a beautiful homestead with a large vegetable garden, chickens, bees, and seemingly infinite forest to explore. I feel incredibly honored to be warmly welcome onto their land as an extension of their community.

Other important things to consider are electricity and water. There is already an electrical pole complete with AC outlets, so that I can simply plug the house in for power. There is also a nearby creek from which I can pump water for the kitchen sink + shower, and a nearby well where I can collect fresh drinking water. The home will have a composting dry toilet, for which I will need to setup a humanure system

Pinterest Board

Go to our pinterest board to see a small collection of the ideas and inspiration we gathered for the concept design.

Above are the conceptual drawings of the tiny home, designed by architect Kevin Ward of Southeast Ecological Design, Inc., who is part of the Nanostead team. The designer/builder team have built many homes in the area, but this will be their first official tiny home project. As their first client, I was fortunate to be able to contribute to the design process based on my personal needs and wants, and am so pleased with the results.

Unlike many tiny homes out there, the entrance is on the longer face of the building, and the sleeping loft is centered in the middle. From the above view, the living area is on the left, and the kitchen and bath to the right.