Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/2320th
  • 3mm
Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/322th
  • 3mm
Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/1656th
  • 3mm
Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/1208th
  • 3mm
Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/120th
  • 3mm
Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/120th
  • 2mm
Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 
The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.
I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 
My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 
I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/426th
  • 3mm

Today I drove along the French Broad River up to Marshall, to see the progress of the house and discuss some of the interior detailing with the builders. 

The roof is in place, and the exterior trim is nearly complete! All of the exterior wood is local pine from D.T. Ramsey’s, a family-run lumber mill located in Marshall. Using a sprayer, they are coating the wood with Lifetime, a non-toxic wood treatment that protects the wood from rotting, but does not seal it, allowing the wood to breathe and age naturally.

I crawled up into the loft to check out the parallelogram window that was recently installed. The space is interesting and has good light. There have been a few times that I questioned our choice for a shed roof and relatively confined sleeping loft, especially when I see more spacious loft designs with a traditional gabled roof. But what I like about the space up there is that it feels private, and separate from the rest of the home. I can imagine sleeping up there while someone else is downstairs cooking, reading, what have you, and I would feel removed from their activity. It feels like a nest, and a space that will encourage good sleep. 

My job over the next few weeks is to find and purchase the light fixtures, kitchen + bath hardware, kitchen sink + countertop, flooring, etc….the interior details. Typically a builder will have all of this pre-determined for their tiny home models, but because this is a prototype home, and I am choosing to pay extra for custom finishes, they are leaving it up to me to make the decisions. I had already picked out lighting fixtures, but today I realized that they are far too big for the space. 

I included a picture of myself, to say hello, and to say that I’m a happy camper, or will be soon enough. It feels right to have people I know and trust building a home for me, people who share similar values and ideals. I’m feeling lucky and inspired, and welcoming of the lifestyle shift that this home will impress upon me.

WHY TINY? 

To get grounded, to get free.

The above pictures (taken from the web) are of Curry Village in Yosemite National Park, where I lived and worked nearly twenty years ago. Myself, along with most employees in the park, lived in these clustered tent cabins. We worked and played, hiked and swam, made art and music, read books, and cooked in our free time, which we had a lot of. The tent cabin, no larger than 10 x 10 feet, was mostly a place to rest, to store my belongings. The rest of my days were spent out of doors, not in the recreational sense, as we tend to think when we think of a national park, but in the sense of literally living outside of my home.

It was an idyllic setting, living at the base of a peaceful valley amongst the backdrop of sublime glacial walls. The simplicity of my home, my lack of possessions, the abundance of friends at my doorstep, the secret swimming holes, the night sky as my theater - I can’t recall a time in my life that I felt more free. Granted, I had far less responsibility than I do now, but perhaps that is the essence of what tiny living is about. 

Since then I have lived in a few other small dwellings. For most of my twenties I insisted that all of my possessions should fit in the back of a van. I needed a physical limit to what I considered to be enough. I spent three years in a 200 square foot studio basement apartment in San Francisco. And another eight months in a 1950s mobile trailer on the turquoise shores of Abel Tasman, New Zealand. These sort of conditions seem to suit me. They provide a nest, a place of solitude for my introverted nature, yet they are too small to spend significant amounts of time in. They encourage stepping outside more often, staying in tune with one’s surroundings, whether that be a forest or city block, a neighbor or a bird.

Small quarters limit our ability to acquire. It creates a framework for making concessions and compromises. It helps us evaluate what is essential and worthy of our time, our money, our attention. It is truly remarkable how little I actually need to be content. I’ve been testing the boundaries of this, and have found for myself, the more that I own and the more that I want, the more burdened I feel. The conscious choice to live with less, for myself, is akin to freedom. There are plenty of inspirational quotes that say that far more eloquently. You’ve probably heard them. 

That said, we’re all in need of shelter, and have different perspectives on what is enough depending on an infinite number of factors. I’ve been rambling for most of my life and at some point felt that I needed a HOME. A physical place to ground me, a place to return to. Though personally, I don’t care to get weighed down by mortgage payments, home maintenance and decoration. Maybe I’m just lazy. Who knows. Who cares. What matters is that I’ve had a taste of what it means to live with less responsibility, and it’s more joyful. I’m referring to a personal kind of responsibility - the kind that has everything to do with me, my comfort level, my preferences, my status. It is an entirely self-imposed responsibility based on distinct life choices.

I can live in a very small home, with fewer possessions, and still be a highly responsible adult. In fact, I’d argue that it makes me more responsible to my community and society as a whole.

I know myself.

The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/125th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 40
  • f/2.4
  • 1/24th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 64
  • f/2.4
  • 1/24th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 80
  • f/2.4
  • 1/24th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 200
  • f/2.4
  • 1/24th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/120th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/253th
  • 3mm
The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 
Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 40
  • f/2.4
  • 1/120th
  • 3mm

The windows and sliding glass door were installed yesterday. It’s starting to look and feel like a house, on wheels! The extra investment in large windows is so worth the amount of light and openness they provide. Next up will be installation of the roofing, plumbing and electrical. 

Alright, that’s all for now. More soon!

Last week I checked out the progress of the home construction. The loft and roof are framed out, and the structural sheathing panels are up. A sense of the space is tangible now, and I must say, it is definitely tiny!!! 
It will be a few more weeks until the doors and windows arrive. In the meantime, Tony and I have been scouting for materials and finishes for the interior flooring, walls + ceiling. We visited Blue Ridge Surplus in West Asheville, a construction salvage yard that has piles and piles of excess materials left over from construction jobs at discount prices. I was so distracted by everything they sell that I forgot to take pictures…will be sure to do so when we go back there to purchase.
We also visited Build It Naturally in downtown Asheville, a retail store selling quality sustainable building materials. We will be purchasing non-toxic wood finishes and paints from them, including a cool product called LifeTime, a non-toxic natural substance that penetrates wood fibers to create a permanent seal without creating harmful residues in our soil and water. It allows the wood to age beautifully without rot or decay. 
This week I plan to build a digital model of the interior with Google Sketchup, to work on the design and placement of interior furnishings, like seating and tables, and then consult with my friend Rob Maddox, an architect at Shelter Collective, for ideas on how to maximize the function of the space without cluttering it. 
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/1159th
  • 3mm
Last week I checked out the progress of the home construction. The loft and roof are framed out, and the structural sheathing panels are up. A sense of the space is tangible now, and I must say, it is definitely tiny!!! 
It will be a few more weeks until the doors and windows arrive. In the meantime, Tony and I have been scouting for materials and finishes for the interior flooring, walls + ceiling. We visited Blue Ridge Surplus in West Asheville, a construction salvage yard that has piles and piles of excess materials left over from construction jobs at discount prices. I was so distracted by everything they sell that I forgot to take pictures…will be sure to do so when we go back there to purchase.
We also visited Build It Naturally in downtown Asheville, a retail store selling quality sustainable building materials. We will be purchasing non-toxic wood finishes and paints from them, including a cool product called LifeTime, a non-toxic natural substance that penetrates wood fibers to create a permanent seal without creating harmful residues in our soil and water. It allows the wood to age beautifully without rot or decay. 
This week I plan to build a digital model of the interior with Google Sketchup, to work on the design and placement of interior furnishings, like seating and tables, and then consult with my friend Rob Maddox, an architect at Shelter Collective, for ideas on how to maximize the function of the space without cluttering it. 
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 50
  • f/2.4
  • 1/120th
  • 3mm
Last week I checked out the progress of the home construction. The loft and roof are framed out, and the structural sheathing panels are up. A sense of the space is tangible now, and I must say, it is definitely tiny!!! 
It will be a few more weeks until the doors and windows arrive. In the meantime, Tony and I have been scouting for materials and finishes for the interior flooring, walls + ceiling. We visited Blue Ridge Surplus in West Asheville, a construction salvage yard that has piles and piles of excess materials left over from construction jobs at discount prices. I was so distracted by everything they sell that I forgot to take pictures…will be sure to do so when we go back there to purchase.
We also visited Build It Naturally in downtown Asheville, a retail store selling quality sustainable building materials. We will be purchasing non-toxic wood finishes and paints from them, including a cool product called LifeTime, a non-toxic natural substance that penetrates wood fibers to create a permanent seal without creating harmful residues in our soil and water. It allows the wood to age beautifully without rot or decay. 
This week I plan to build a digital model of the interior with Google Sketchup, to work on the design and placement of interior furnishings, like seating and tables, and then consult with my friend Rob Maddox, an architect at Shelter Collective, for ideas on how to maximize the function of the space without cluttering it. 
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/597th
  • 3mm
Last week I checked out the progress of the home construction. The loft and roof are framed out, and the structural sheathing panels are up. A sense of the space is tangible now, and I must say, it is definitely tiny!!! 
It will be a few more weeks until the doors and windows arrive. In the meantime, Tony and I have been scouting for materials and finishes for the interior flooring, walls + ceiling. We visited Blue Ridge Surplus in West Asheville, a construction salvage yard that has piles and piles of excess materials left over from construction jobs at discount prices. I was so distracted by everything they sell that I forgot to take pictures…will be sure to do so when we go back there to purchase.
We also visited Build It Naturally in downtown Asheville, a retail store selling quality sustainable building materials. We will be purchasing non-toxic wood finishes and paints from them, including a cool product called LifeTime, a non-toxic natural substance that penetrates wood fibers to create a permanent seal without creating harmful residues in our soil and water. It allows the wood to age beautifully without rot or decay. 
This week I plan to build a digital model of the interior with Google Sketchup, to work on the design and placement of interior furnishings, like seating and tables, and then consult with my friend Rob Maddox, an architect at Shelter Collective, for ideas on how to maximize the function of the space without cluttering it. 
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/345th
  • 3mm

Last week I checked out the progress of the home construction. The loft and roof are framed out, and the structural sheathing panels are up. A sense of the space is tangible now, and I must say, it is definitely tiny!!! 

It will be a few more weeks until the doors and windows arrive. In the meantime, Tony and I have been scouting for materials and finishes for the interior flooring, walls + ceiling. We visited Blue Ridge Surplus in West Asheville, a construction salvage yard that has piles and piles of excess materials left over from construction jobs at discount prices. I was so distracted by everything they sell that I forgot to take pictures…will be sure to do so when we go back there to purchase.

We also visited Build It Naturally in downtown Asheville, a retail store selling quality sustainable building materials. We will be purchasing non-toxic wood finishes and paints from them, including a cool product called LifeTime, a non-toxic natural substance that penetrates wood fibers to create a permanent seal without creating harmful residues in our soil and water. It allows the wood to age beautifully without rot or decay. 

This week I plan to build a digital model of the interior with Google Sketchup, to work on the design and placement of interior furnishings, like seating and tables, and then consult with my friend Rob Maddox, an architect at Shelter Collective, for ideas on how to maximize the function of the space without cluttering it. 

I finally made it out to the job site to see the tiny house project in person. It is parked in an empty lot on Main Street in downtown Marshall, NC, along the French Broad River. Such a beautiful and charming town. Someone was playing Johnny Cash covers in front of town hall.
Jeramy and Tony, pictured above, are the building team behind Nanostead. They are working on this project, their first tiny home on wheels, in between other home building projects, so progress is expected be a touch slower than one might expect. 
They are framing out the walls, and today we decided on window and door options. We all agreed that windows and insulation are some of the fundamental elements in a home that you don’t want to skimp on. 
I left there feeling inspired, excited to see it take shape, and am thankful to have such good people building a home for me. It all feels just right.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/190th
  • 3mm
I finally made it out to the job site to see the tiny house project in person. It is parked in an empty lot on Main Street in downtown Marshall, NC, along the French Broad River. Such a beautiful and charming town. Someone was playing Johnny Cash covers in front of town hall.
Jeramy and Tony, pictured above, are the building team behind Nanostead. They are working on this project, their first tiny home on wheels, in between other home building projects, so progress is expected be a touch slower than one might expect. 
They are framing out the walls, and today we decided on window and door options. We all agreed that windows and insulation are some of the fundamental elements in a home that you don’t want to skimp on. 
I left there feeling inspired, excited to see it take shape, and am thankful to have such good people building a home for me. It all feels just right.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/420th
  • 3mm
I finally made it out to the job site to see the tiny house project in person. It is parked in an empty lot on Main Street in downtown Marshall, NC, along the French Broad River. Such a beautiful and charming town. Someone was playing Johnny Cash covers in front of town hall.
Jeramy and Tony, pictured above, are the building team behind Nanostead. They are working on this project, their first tiny home on wheels, in between other home building projects, so progress is expected be a touch slower than one might expect. 
They are framing out the walls, and today we decided on window and door options. We all agreed that windows and insulation are some of the fundamental elements in a home that you don’t want to skimp on. 
I left there feeling inspired, excited to see it take shape, and am thankful to have such good people building a home for me. It all feels just right.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/191th
  • 3mm
I finally made it out to the job site to see the tiny house project in person. It is parked in an empty lot on Main Street in downtown Marshall, NC, along the French Broad River. Such a beautiful and charming town. Someone was playing Johnny Cash covers in front of town hall.
Jeramy and Tony, pictured above, are the building team behind Nanostead. They are working on this project, their first tiny home on wheels, in between other home building projects, so progress is expected be a touch slower than one might expect. 
They are framing out the walls, and today we decided on window and door options. We all agreed that windows and insulation are some of the fundamental elements in a home that you don’t want to skimp on. 
I left there feeling inspired, excited to see it take shape, and am thankful to have such good people building a home for me. It all feels just right.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/252th
  • 3mm
I finally made it out to the job site to see the tiny house project in person. It is parked in an empty lot on Main Street in downtown Marshall, NC, along the French Broad River. Such a beautiful and charming town. Someone was playing Johnny Cash covers in front of town hall.
Jeramy and Tony, pictured above, are the building team behind Nanostead. They are working on this project, their first tiny home on wheels, in between other home building projects, so progress is expected be a touch slower than one might expect. 
They are framing out the walls, and today we decided on window and door options. We all agreed that windows and insulation are some of the fundamental elements in a home that you don’t want to skimp on. 
I left there feeling inspired, excited to see it take shape, and am thankful to have such good people building a home for me. It all feels just right.
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/337th
  • 3mm

I finally made it out to the job site to see the tiny house project in person. It is parked in an empty lot on Main Street in downtown Marshall, NC, along the French Broad River. Such a beautiful and charming town. Someone was playing Johnny Cash covers in front of town hall.

Jeramy and Tony, pictured above, are the building team behind Nanostead. They are working on this project, their first tiny home on wheels, in between other home building projects, so progress is expected be a touch slower than one might expect. 

They are framing out the walls, and today we decided on window and door options. We all agreed that windows and insulation are some of the fundamental elements in a home that you don’t want to skimp on. 

I left there feeling inspired, excited to see it take shape, and am thankful to have such good people building a home for me. It all feels just right.

It’s a tiny home village. If all goes according to plan, I will be parking the tiny home on my friend’s land in Candler, in this field next to this yome. It is an ideal spot in so many ways.
For one, I’ll be in the company of good friends with whom I share similar values and lifestyle choices. They have a beautiful homestead with a large vegetable garden, chickens, bees, and seemingly infinite forest to explore. I feel incredibly honored to be warmly welcome onto their land as an extension of their community.
Other important things to consider are electricity and water. There is already an electrical pole complete with AC outlets, so that I can simply plug the house in for power. There is also a nearby creek from which I can pump water for the kitchen sink + shower, and a nearby well where I can collect fresh drinking water. The home will have a composting dry toilet, for which I will need to setup a humanure system. 
Zoom Info
  • Camera
  • ISO
  • Aperture
  • Exposure
  • Focal Length
  • Unknown iPod
  • 32
  • f/2.4
  • 1/463th
  • 3mm

It’s a tiny home village. If all goes according to plan, I will be parking the tiny home on my friend’s land in Candler, in this field next to this yome. It is an ideal spot in so many ways.

For one, I’ll be in the company of good friends with whom I share similar values and lifestyle choices. They have a beautiful homestead with a large vegetable garden, chickens, bees, and seemingly infinite forest to explore. I feel incredibly honored to be warmly welcome onto their land as an extension of their community.

Other important things to consider are electricity and water. There is already an electrical pole complete with AC outlets, so that I can simply plug the house in for power. There is also a nearby creek from which I can pump water for the kitchen sink + shower, and a nearby well where I can collect fresh drinking water. The home will have a composting dry toilet, for which I will need to setup a humanure system

Pinterest Board

Go to our pinterest board to see a small collection of the ideas and inspiration we gathered for the concept design.

Above are the conceptual drawings of the tiny home, designed by architect Kevin Ward of Southeast Ecological Design, Inc., who is part of the Nanostead team. The designer/builder team have built many homes in the area, but this will be their first official tiny home project. As their first client, I was fortunate to be able to contribute to the design process based on my personal needs and wants, and am so pleased with the results.

Unlike many tiny homes out there, the entrance is on the longer face of the building, and the sleeping loft is centered in the middle. From the above view, the living area is on the left, and the kitchen and bath to the right.